Tag Archive: Art

Gallery visit – Inventing Impressionism: Paul Durand-Ruel and the Modern Art Market at the National Gallery

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square

Today I went to the new Impressionism gallery in the Sainsbury Wing of the National Gallery. Back in November I enjoyed the Rembrandt exhibition there more than I expected to, but I’ve always rather liked Rembrandt and have never been keen on Impressionism, so was pleasantly surprised that I enjoyed this more than anticipated as well. Quite a lot more, really – because it’s allowed me to really refine what I do and don’t like in impressionism. In fact, what I really am not very keen on is the painting of Monet. I actually really greatly admire Renoir’s work, and the greater part of Manet’s and Degas’ too – when they are not being too slapdash. Pissarro and Sisley, also well-represented here, are hit and miss, but at their best they are admirable. The problem I have with Monet is that I don’t feel his paintings stand alone. To appreciate the artistic statement he is making, one has to have an overview of his artistic development, and I think that is a weakness. With every Renoir painting I’ve seen and all but a few of those from Degas, no matter how experimental they are with their techniques, colour choices or compositions, there is still evidence of the master technician, the clever painter with an eye for light and texture, whose bold choices are justified by the picture as a whole. Manet in particular often balances the loose impressionist elements with touches of realism in just the right way to be clever and experimental while also new and challenging, which seems to me the manifestation of his love for Velasquez. But with Monet, it is clear that he pushes boundaries and made striking statements, but I can’t say that I enjoy the results. I don’t find them pleasing to look at, or painterly, or clever. He was clearly technically gifted and likely rigorously trained, but one has to see his early painting to know that – rather like Picasso. There isn’t that admirable cleverness or evidence of solid technique in his later works, and while I see that there’s something admirable in that academically – he truly embraced the statement Impressionism was making without any need to anchor himself in the old-fashioned – the result doesn’t please me or impress me.
Looking confused outside the gallery

Looking confused outside the gallery

The exhibition was based around the life of art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel, who championed the Impressionists when they were being rejected by the Salon and eventually ended up being vindicated as the ‘New Painting’ became highly fashionable. American money, of course, helped – as did leaving France when war was declare with Prussia and setting up a gallery in New Bond Street, London. Though close to bankruptcy on occasion, he is now considered a pioneer and set up many established practices such as running solo exhibitions for artists during their lifetimes and acting as a kind of patron to painters in need – including commissioning painted doors in his apartments and several portraits of his family members. I can’t say I’m touched on any emotional level by the impressionism I’ve seen, as I can be by the works of the Old Masters, the surrealists, the pre-Raphaelites or even some of the realists. Degas is probably the one most likely to paint something to move me, though Renoir paints things I find lovely to look at. After the gallery, to Chinatown for dim sum – though the rice and noodles we ordered were a bit excessive so a few dumplings had to be taken home as dabao!
A feast of dim sum!

A feast of dim sum!

Went to meet the band afterwards, and got all the letters ready to submit to labels as well as getting the audio ready to make a trailer. Once the four of us got together – for the first time in forever – we did some basic photos for publicity shots, though we’re going to arrange more with a proper photographer soon. All that remains is the artwork, the teaser and the website – then we’ll begin the submissions process for our distribution deal! Tomorrow, off to Manchester to do some more archival research. Then I’ll probably spend Tuesday in the library with the historical books I was recommended – and then go back to fiction-writing for a good long while.