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A Trip to England – in foods I’ve missed!

Supermarket meal deals!

Marmite on toast!

Greasy takeaway pizza shared with friends

Crispy aromatic duck (bonus - char siu bao!)

Takeaway curry served in foil containers

Mum's pasta with 'Bolognese' sauce

Apple crumble and custard!

Proper seaside fish and chips

Mum's amazing Christmas cooking

Bangers and mash

Duck curry from the local Thai restaurant

Birthday meal 2016 – Galvin la Chapelle

Each year, my parents treat me to a special meal for my birthday. This year, I chose Galvin la Chapelle in Spitalfields, a restaurant we’d been to before, but which I remembered as having a beautiful setting and great food. Thus, when I found Gordon Ramsay at Royal Hospital Road booked up as usual, I decided on la Chapelle.

The decor - It’s certainly one of the most memorable of London’s fine-dining restaurants, with its beautiful ceiling and floating mezzanine level, and the food was excellent, too. We opted for the Menu Gourmand, a seven-course tasting menu, and every dish was an excellent complement to the last.

     

Lasagne of Dorset crab, beurre Nantais and pea shoots - The first dish was a ‘lasagne’ of crab, which was a neat start to proceedings but probably the weakest moment of the meal. The crab meat was superb but the dish as a whole was a little on the tasteless side.

Ballotine of Landes fois gras, confit quince and brioche - Next came a very rich and well-balanced foie gras pate course, with soft but crispy brioche and the right amount of cutting sweetness from the confit. Very well-done, and I would have liked to have had more.

Risotto of Burgundy black truffle, Jerusalem artichoke and wood sorrel - The third course was risotto with black truffles, combining to make a very strong, almost garlicky flavour – it was a small dish but probably the best risotto I’ve ever eaten. I enjoy very strong flavours, and this hit the spot.

Wild sea bass, marinière of cockles, sea beets and Jersey oyster - The fish course was excellent. Sea bass is my favourite cooked fish in any case, but what really made this dish fantastic was the crispy skin. Everything combined into a very appealing centrepiece to this meal.

Denham Estate venison, lemon thyme white polenta and forest mushrooms - The climactic meat dish was venison – a better option than the pigeon that was on the website sample menu, I think! The flavours were strong and rich but somehow the balance seemed off here. There was too much in the sauce that was battling with the taste of the meat. So while still delicious, this was one I felt could have been better. I didn’t get a picture, but next came cheese – truffled brie de Meaux with confit William pear and truffle honey. A strong cheese and a nice balance, I was very pleased to have decent cheese for the first time in a while!

Apple tarte Tatin with Normandy crème fraîche - To finish the meal, we enjoyed a well-made tarte tatin, a favourite of mine. The crème fraîche was well-made and nothing was overpowering, but the dessert was not a stand-out – it didn’t seem markedly better than any tarte tatin from a local bakery. But that’s not to say it wasn’t very pleasant. The standard of every course here was high and the risotto really stood out as a cut above any other I’ve tried. A very fine meal, in a beautiful setting!

Memorial Symposium in Tokyo University

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At Tokyo University

Though many good things happened in my professional life, the past year has been a sad one for my family. My aunt died much too young in November, 2015 and then last month her mother, my grandmother, also passed away. By unfortunate coincidence, both were while I was in Japan, and at times I was unable to return to England to attend their funerals, so I haven’t honestly been able to feel I’ve had a chance to pay my respects or fully reflect on their lives. Next month, I’ll be returning to England, and will be able to visit their graves, but fortunately there was also a memorial event for my aunt yesterday in Tokyo University.

My aunt was a prominent scholar of French literature and had attended a number of academic conferences here in Japan, as well as hosting many Japanese scholars who were interested in visiting the Samuel Beckett archives at Reading University. So her kind friends and colleagues over here in Tokyo arranged a memorial day, in conjunction with a memorial symposium a year after her death over in England. Since I’m living in Tokyo, it made sense for me to attend and deliver a message from my uncle, giving me a chance to pay my respects.

My hosts set up a lovely event. This was my first time in the University of Tokyo, and the Komaba campus is small and pretty. After finding the correct building, I was led to a room full of scholars, some young but most older, with the somewhat languid air of lifelong academics. Most were Japanese, though there was one other Westerner, another Brit named David whose life, it seems, was intertwined with my aunt’s right from their undergraduate days.20161122-02

I was greeted very warmly, and though the event was in a typical academic meeting room, there was a smiling photograph of my aunt, a display of her books and pretty floral displays.

The opening memorial service was touching. Friends of my aunt from her academic circle ran through her biography, and then gave their personal reminiscences, often with photographs - both of her visits to Japan and their visits to England. They found a particular significance and comfort in her last words being, ‘It’s exciting.’ I was invited to read my uncle’s message, which was received with appreciation, and later had a chance to give my own account, centred on memories of the family gathering at Christmastime. Even though I was in a room of strangers, we were all connected through my aunt, so I wa20161122-03s grateful to have such a chance to pay my respects.

20161122-05This was followed by an academic symposium responding to my aunt’s legacy. Admittedly, while I could follow the personal reminiscences, which other than my own had all been in Japanese, when it came to academic vocabulary and analysis I was mostly lost, really only able to follow one lecture on Samuel Beckett and Music. Nonetheless, I was pleased to be part of the event.20161122-04

Next, we went to nearby Shibuya to enjoy a meal in my aunt’s honour. As is traditional after a symposium, we went to an izakaya, a Japanese restaurant where the emphasis is on drinking, and my hosts had selected Gonpachi. Gonpachi is a famous chain in Japan with very traditional décor, a different branch made particularly famous recently as a location in Quentin Tarantino’s movie Kill Bill. We had a private room where we enjoyed an extended ‘Nabe course’, which culminated in a hot pot but mostly delighted me with the smaller dishes that came first – delicious sashimi, large korroke and a kind of Chinese-style dish slightly reminiscent of hairy prawns. It was a superb meal, accompanied by plenty of beer with which to toast my aunt.

20161122-06I didn’t speak much Japanese that evening, as I sat with David and listened to his stories about my aunt and his own interesting career. Like me, he studied at Cambridge, plays in a band and has a keen interest in progressive rock. I learned a

The flowers I was given from the event

The flowers I was given from the event

lot about Samuel Beckett, particularly regarding his interest in sport, and felt quite emboldened to be able to talk about my thesis for the first time since finishing it, as well as my book. I am grateful I had a chance to meet such an interesting group of people, and this was really my first time interacting with academia in Tokyo, so I feel quite grateful to have had the opportunity.

I’m not sure if I will ever return to the university, or see any of the other campuses, but who knows? Perhaps in the future I’ll be able to return.

Album video review

An interesting, fair review of my band's album from Notes: It's something of a curate's egg review, but I think his criticisms are very valid. We've staked a place in the prog scene, and going forward from here it's going to be very important to offer something new and unique. Plus he says very nice things about my drums, which is always welcome! Check out the album trailer here: And if you're tempted to check us out, head to paradigmshiftuk.bandcamp.com!

Book Launched!

My book has been published! I couldn't be more thrilled. A lovely interview has been posted by the Swanky Seventeens about it. Please check it out here: https://swankyseventeens.wordpress.com/2016/10/06/the-debut-club-an-interview-with-bryan-methods/

Review from This Kid Reviews Books

Another fantastic early review today, this time from Erik over at This Kid Reviews Books. "This was an awesome book ... The plot is very thrilling, and keeps you on the edge of your seat wanting more" It's incredibly valuable for me to get feedback from the target audience, so I've been very much looking forward to hearing Erik's thoughts and I am thrilled to receive such a positive review. Please check out the review and the rest of Erik's fine site by clicking below: scant Review! The Thief’s Apprentice by Bryan Methods

First review of The Thief’s Apprentice!

Many thanks to Jessica over at Tales Between the Pages for the first advanced review of The Thief's Apprentice! It's a great, balanced review I'm delighted to share! "Great for kids who have active imaginations and who love thrilling adventure stories ... the chase at the end was everything I wanted at the end of a middle grade." Please check it out at the link below!
Review: The Thief’s Apprentice by Bryan Methods