Monthly Archive: July 2017

Fine dining: Galvin at Windows

I’m back in the UK for a few weeks – and meeting my family these days means trying out a delicious fine dining restaurant! I’ve been over-eating the whole trip, but this will be the highlight – my first trip to Galvin at Windows, high up on the 28th floor of the Hilton Hotel at Hyde Park Corner.
I’ve been to other Galvin restaurants, mostly recently Galvin la Chapelle, and my family had been here before, but it was my first time. This Michelin-starred branch is headed by South Korean chef Joo Won, and while we were led to expect South Korean influences, I can’t say I detected any. What we enjoyed was Anglo-Franco fine dining, most likely because we opted for the Sunday lunch menu.

After enjoying the view out over Baker Street and Gloucester Place, spotting familiar places and trying to figure out where certain key places were, my first course was seared foie gras on Iberico pork and brioche with tomato chutney. All the elements were excellent, and there was a very pleasant variety here, but the overall taste of the dish became peculiarly like an extremely high-quality hamburger – with foie gras. It was tasty, but I much preferred the simple, straightforward presentation of foie gras I had at Gordon Ramsay at Royal Hospital Road.

Next was a variation on beef with Yorkshire pudding – only the beef was a fillet and the gravy was peppercorn sauce. This was an excellent dish, with high-quality meat, some interesting flavours to match the very traditional Yorkshire pud, and with a little cabbage that added interest to the texture and some light flavour to an otherwise heavy dish. My one complaint was that the sauce was a little too sweet overall.

We had some cheese next. I never used to like cheese, but cheese with grapes works so well. The Roquefort was particularly tasty with it!

Dessert was an apple tarte tatin, one of my favourites. With a light Rosemary ice cream, it was a little more than I needed since we had cheese as well, but very delicious.

They also made Dad a little birthday cake! That was sweet – can’t fault the customer service today.

 

WWE Live Tokyo

I was never a big fan of wrestling when I was younger. I played some of the video games with friends, and knew the biggest stars, but I rarely if ever watched any actual matches. 

Recently, though, I've been introduced to the wrestling going on right now and started to get involved in the funny storylines of heels and faces, grudges and partnerships, and found it more and more fun. So when there was a chance to go to see a show live in the Ryougoku Kokugikan as a birthday excursion, I got the ticket and got hype!

It's a bit of a shame I'm a bit late to see the legends of the show. The Undertaker just retired and there's no chance to see the likes of The Rock, Stone Cold or Kane. Golddust was scheduled to be part of this show, but when his tag team broke up. his slot got replaced. Of the older wrestlers, there were only Chris Jericho - who put on a great opening performance against a Japanese upstart from NXT - and I guess Rhyno. But watching wrestling live isn't about nostalgia - it's probably better to see new talent, and it's the wrestlers I have never paid that much attention to, like Seth Rollins, Dean Ambrose and Neville, who really put their all into this show. 

There were some other storyline-based disappointments. Enzo Amore and Big Cass were another tag team that just broke up, so all we saw of them was a 1-minute scene continuing that storyline that made it feel like a big waste that they came to Japan at all. While it had its moments and it was great fun to see two women's champions facing off against each other, the bi 6-woman tag team match was a bit less impressive than I'd hoped, with no big grappling throws or aerial showboating and a whole lot of Asuka's obsession with her butt spreading to the other women. In particular, Nia Jax didn't get to do enough. 

But the overall show was incredibly enjoyable. What surprised me was how exciting it was to LISTEN to the show. I expected the pumping music with fantastic bass coming through an arena sound system, but the surprise was how great the ring itself sounds, the stamping and slamming and heavy landings. Plus getting involved in all the crowd chants and claps and waving of phone lights for Bray Wyatt's entrance is undeniably fun. 

Honestly, I lost track of who's heel and who's face most of the time, and don't understand why Roman Reigns attracts such polarised reactions - the crowd was very vocal over whether they loved or hated him - and it's interesting how they seem to be building up Finn Balor as a major up-and-coming character. 

This was a great show to be caught up in, one  i never thought that I would enjoy as much as I did, but it's definitely something I'd like to do again.